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Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nadia Murad Stands With Justice For Lai Dai Han2019-05-30T11:22:38+00:00

NOBEL PEACE PRIZE LAUREATE NADIA MURAD STANDS WITH JUSTICE FOR LAI DAI HAN

On June 11th, Nobel Peace Prize winner Nadia Murad will unveil a statue to commemorate victims of sexual violence
 
London, United Kingdom, May 30, 2019 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nadia Murad will be at Church House near Westminster at 6.30pm on 11th June 2019 to unveil a statue to honour all victims of sexual violence. Nadia will be joined by VIP guests from the UK Parliament as part of this historic event.
 
Nadia Murad, 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, said:
 
“I support recent efforts by the Vietnamese victims of sexual violence to seek recognition and justice. On June 11th, I look forward to meeting with the victims and hearing their stories first-hand.”
 
Jack Straw, former UK foreign secretary and international ambassador for JLDH, said:
 
The JLDH statue is a fitting tribute to all victims of sexual violence, and especially the Lai Dai Han and their mothers who have for so long been crying out for recognition of their plight by the Government of South Korea. For too long these victims of Korean sexual violence have been forgotten and cast aside by society.
 
-ENDS-
 
 
ABOUT THE LAI DAI HAN
 
The “Lai Dai Han” are the tens of thousands of children of Vietnamese women that were raped by South Korean soldiers during the Vietnam War. Between 1964 and 1973, some 320,000 South Korean soldiers were deployed to Vietnam to fight alongside the United States.
 
Justice for Lai Dai Han gives a voice to the victims and their children and campaigns for South Korea to recognise and investigate the allegations of widespread rape and sexual violence.
 
Justice for Lai Dai Han works with policy makers, writers and artists to ensure this injustice is finally recognised, alongside fundraising efforts on behalf of the Lai Dai Han and their families.
 
Our work seeks to raise public awareness, to allow political and community leaders to connect with the victims of sexual violence to understand their suffering first hand, and to create public art as a permanent reminder of the plight of the Lai Dai Han.